The Faux-Left and the Woke Function

Why do I say that the postmodernist species of critical theory that prevails today—critical race theory, queer theory, etc.—pseudo- or faux-leftism? Why is woke not left? Because it’s anti-worker, authoritarian, and illiberal. Denying nature and science, this line of thought/practice is profoundly anti-humanist and anti-science. No Marxist would deny natural history and the utility of science. Moreover, Marxism precludes idealism as an epistemological foundation.

The political right labels this faux-left standpoint “neo-Marxist.” But so do many of those who push CRT and the other crackpot theories. To be sure, much of the Frankfurt School so often targeted by the right is properly designated neo-Marxist (Adorno, Benjamin, Fromm, Horkheimer, Neumann), but Herbert Marcuse’s thought is so far outside Marxism that it cannot be with any integrity properly designated as such, and it is Marcuse who is responsible for what passes for critical theory today—that and the corrupting influence of French existentialism/poststructuralism. 

Herbert Marcuse, guru of the New Left

You might stop and ask yourself why, if all this jazz were truly Marxist, corporations have taken up its ideas with gusto, pushing them in HR trainings and in external messaging. Why are corporations funding the activities of so-called neo-Marxist groups like Black Lives Matter? Why is it that that, in the academic rhetoric of intersectionality, social class is rarely mention (and never in terms of itself), with no class analysis, while the working class is fractured along lines of race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, gender identity, etc.? Why do identitarian politics, with all their abstractions and reifications, not merely stand in place of but negate class politics? 

Remember, Marx and Engels told us that life is not determined by consciousness but consciousness determined by life:

“The fact is, therefore, that definite individuals who are productively active in a definite way enter into these definite social and political relations. Empirical observations must in each separate instance bring out empirically, and without any mystification and speculation, the connection of the social and political structure with production. The social structure and the State are continually evolving out of the life-process of definite individuals, but of individuals, not as they may appear in their own or other people’s imagination, but as they really are; i.e., as they are effective, produce materially, and are active under definite material limits, presuppositions and conditions independent of their will.

“The production of ideas, of conceptions, of consciousness, is at first directly interwoven with the material activity and the material intercourse of men, the language of real life. Conceiving, thinking, the mental intercourse of men, appear at this stage as the direct afflux from their material behavior. The same applies to mental production as expressed in the language of the politics, laws, morality, religion, metaphysics of a people. Men are the producers of their conceptions, ideas, etc. —real, active men, as they are conditioned by the definite development of their productive forces and of the intercourse corresponding to these, up to its furthest forms. Consciousness can never be anything else than conscious existence, and the existence of men in their actual lifeprocess. If in all ideology men and their circumstances appear upside down as in a camera obscura, this phenomenon arises just as much from their historical life-process as the inversion of objects on the retina does from their physical life-process.

“It is not consciousness of men that determines their being, but, on the contrary, their social being that determines their consciousness.” 

What is being passed off as neo-Marxism today is an iteration of progressivism (woke), a praxis advanced by the corporate state to prevent the development of class consciousness by dividing the proletariat into identity groups, treating abstractions in an essentialist fashion, all rationalized by an ideology masquerading as politics for the powerless. It’s an element in the hegemonic control of the mass identified by Antonio Gramsci in his Prison Notebooks. It is not a species of neo-Marxism.

America’s Crime Problem and Why Progressives are to Blame

It’s obvious to attentive and compassionate Americans that standing down police and prosecutors and implementing various reforms, such as cashless bail, especially where it leads to the release of serious offenders back into society where they can do more harm before their cases have been properly adjudicated, has compromised the criminal justice system’s ability to protect citizens from harm by effectively controlling serious deviant behavior. The United States is now experiencing a significant crime wave, an increase in crime and violence that comes after decades of significant reductions in the harms associated with crime—reductions that resulted largely from the historic expansion of the criminal justice apparatus in the early 1990s—and woke progressive social policy is to blame.

The problem of serious crime and violence that began as a public issue in the late 1960s, a problem that grew worse each decade until the culmination of previous interventions and the full-court press in the early 1990s turned the tide, may feel like the distant past today in the early 2020s, but remembering that period, what was behind it, and what we did about it, is highly relevant to understanding the rise in serious criminal offending over the last few years and for shaping public policy going forward. We have now have a before-and-after comparison with which to make rational policy choices that can strengthen public safety against serious deviant behavior. The findings of a historical social experiment are in and they recommend crime control—within due process constraints set down in the United States Bill of Rights. We need more police. We cannot abolish prisons.

Baltimore

For a detailed account of the forces that cause social disorder and serious crime see my blog The Denationalization Project and the End of Capitalism, published on January 30, 2020. This blog not only sheds light on the growth of crime by describing its cultural, economic, and political context, but also its racial character. I want to encourage you to read that blog; over the next couple of paragraphs, I will summarize that content to more explicitly connect this history to the crime problem.

After the immigration restrictions of the early 20th century, which cut off the flow of cheap foreign labor from Europe, American industrialists recruited native-born workers from the South, millions of whom where black, enticing them to leave the backwards and violent region of their birth for northeastern and midwestern urban centers. Back then, around 85 percent of blacks lived in the South. By 1970, the figure had fallen to nearly 50 percent. Industrialists sought cheap labor through a strategy of internal migration; black Americans were provided opportunities to improve their lives and escape poverty and racial oppression. Black Americans became crucial to industrial production and those jobs undergirded family stability in black-majority neighborhoods.

As I explain in that blog, the cutting off of immigration and the integration of black workers in industrial production led to growing worker solidarity which allowed the proletariat to command higher wages and better working conditions. Organized labor played a substantial role in these developments. Moreover, the growing affluence and expectations of black Americans fueled the movement for racial equality. At the same time, the rise of labor power, as well as the rising organic composition of capital (OCC), led to a fall in the rate of profit. This is explained by the theory of surplus value. Labor power generates both workers wages and the surplus value capitalists convert to profit in the market. This is the process of capitalist accumulation. The more of the value produced labor takes in wages, the less value is left over for the capitalist (who produces none of that value). The result is a fall in the rate of profit (sometimes referred to as the “profitability crisis”). Furthermore, the rising OCC results in workers disemployed by automation, mechanization, rationalization and scientific management. Reducing consumer power, rising structural unemployment contributes to a realization crisis wherein surplus cannot be realized as profit in the market.

Beginning in the 1960s, the capitalist class in the United States, represented for the most part by progressives and the Democratic Party, sought to restore the rate of profit by organizing against the working class, abolishing immigration quotas and facilitating the off-shoring of industrial production—in a word, elites globalized the capitalist mode of production. Globalization, by pitting native workers against foreign labor at home and abroad compromised the process of racial integration that had proved so successful in raising proletarian consciousness. This was not accidental. Real racial justice promised to deprive the ruling class of the mechanism they had long used to keep the working class fractured and resentful. By the 1990s, with neoliberalism having restored the rate of profit to some degree (at the very least having stemmed the hemorrhaging), elites were openly repackaging racial animosity in order to fracture the working class—this time as antiracism.

Globalization had devastating effects on the working class, especially black Americans, who became trapped in America’s deindustrialized urban only to be managed by the custodial state progressive stood up during the Great Society (see Poor Mothers, Cash Support, and the Custodial State). In response to the explosion of crime and violence the war on labor and progressives had predictably brought to America’s working class neighborhoods, the establishment waged another war: the war on crime and drugs. The results were a vast expansion of the criminal justice apparatus, which disproportionately affected black men, and a historic reduction in crime and violence—the latter once the state got right the mix of deterrence (the realm of policing) and incapacitation (the realm of the corrections). In the final analysis, then, mass incarceration is a consequence of globalization. Since the corporate state had no intention of repairing the economic devastation globalization brought to working class communities, especially black-majority neighborhoods, crime control was the only real option available. It worked as you can see in the chart below.

Source: FBI

However, since 2014, the historic downward trend in crime and violence have been reversed, and (except for most of the Trump presidency) has steadily increased, accelerating since the spring of 2020. According to National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, between 2020 and 2021, violent crime incidents and offenses increased 29 and 27.5 percent respectively. Homicide for both increased by more than 40 percent. Robbery by 18 percent. Rape incidents and offenses by 38 and 37 percent respectively. Property-crime incidents and offenses 22 percent and 21 percent respectively. 

Taking a longer view, we can date the upward trend in serious crime to the year of Ferguson, the moment that decades of work manufacturing mass belief in “systemic racism” found its poster child in Michael Brown, the origin of the “hands up” myth. (See Demoralization and the Ferguson Effect: What the Left and Right Get Right (and Wrong) About Crime and Violence.)

Source: FBI

In the run up to the most recent midterm elections, Hillary Clinton, the failed candidate for president in 2016, who, you will recall, referred to black youth in the 1990s as “super predators,” claimed recently that red states are as bad for homicide as blue states. Criminologists reading this blog will recognize that this is the wrong unit of analysis. Crime is worst in cities run by progressive Democrats. In fact, of the 30 American cities with the highest murder rates, 27 have Democratic mayors—and at least 14 Soros-backed prosecutors, with many more prosecutors politically progressive and sympathetic to the woke line.

The increase in crime is not only because Democrats have weakened the criminal justice response; through the teaching of racial animosity, Democrats have given young black men and women permission to commit crime as reparations-in-kind (see Is There Systemic Anti-White Racism?). Over the last decade, the corporate state media, legitimizing its propaganda by appealing to the expertise of the progressional and managerial strata, functionaries (or effectively so) ensconced in academic institutions, and grievance merchants standing up activist organizations, have pursued a campaign to convince Americans that the nation is shot through with racism and that whites are to blame.

Zack Goldberg “How the Media Led the Great Racial Awakening,” Tablet (8/4/2020)

With the crackpot academic construction critical race theory in back of their public messaging, woke progressives aggressively disseminate the falsehoods promulgated by the corrupt Black Lives Matter campaign, myths that paint for the imagination cops prowling about America’s inner cities looking for young black men to murder. As I will show in this blog, the claims of BLM are false. (For more on BLM, see What’s Really Going On with #BlackLivesMatter; Corporations Own the Left. Black Lives Matter Proves it.)

In her 2016 book The War on Cops: How the Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe, Heather Mac Donald examines the “Ferguson effect,” a phenomenon identified in 2014 by St. Louis police chief Doyle Sam Dotson III following the police shooting of Michael Brown. In a St. Louis Dispatch story (“Crime Up After Ferguson”), Dotson notes that police officers, cowed by popular antipolice rhetoric, had become reluctant to fully engage their duties, emboldening lawbreakers already encouraged by popular delegitimization of law and order. (Mac Donald had first broached the subject in a May 2015 Wall Street Journal op-ed, “The New Nationwide Crime Wave.” She expanded her argument in The War on Cops.) The balance of this blog will be devoted to debunking the claims manufactured and disseminated by the woke progressive establishment, as well as to a too often ignored consequence of globalization: the destruction of the black family.

* * *

Portland, Oregon

I begin with the false claims of woke progressivism, which actually represent a body of propaganda designed to shift the blame away from the policies of the Democratic Party and onto the party’s political enemy, the populist-nationalist, that is, those who represent the organic interests of the working class, whom progressive elites depict as backwards and racist.

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Police-Public Contact Survey, around 60 million residents 16 years of age and older report having at least one contact with police annually. It might surprise you to learn the number is that large. In fact, it’s much larger than that, given that many individuals reporting contact have more than one encounter with the police in a year. What this means is that, with the US population at more than 330 million citizens and residents (with tens of millions more here illegally), the police have their hands full. Among the advanced Western democracies, the United States is exceptional for its rates of crime and violence.

It might also surprise you (given media coverage) that most contacts involve white civilians, with females slightly more likely to experience contact with a police officer than males. However, this is because whites, especially white females, are more likely to initiate the contact, e.g., in reporting a crime or a disturbance. Males (at around 3 percent) are more likely than females (around 1 percent) to experience threats of use of force. A higher percentage of blacks (around 3 percent) and Hispanics (also around 3 percent) are likely to report experiencing threats or use of force than whites (at around 2 percent). Around 4 percent of blacks and the same percent of Hispanics report having been cuffed during contact, compared to around 2 percent of whites and other races.

That cuffing is reported as the most common use of force when force is reported is a significant fact. Cuffing has become routine at agencies because of the risk to officers when detainees and arrestees have their hands free. This change in policy has contributed to a significant reduction in death and injury occurring to police officers. One may think of this as a workplace safety issue. The negative public perception around routine cuffing is driven by the fact that blacks and Hispanics are more likely to come into contact with police given the overrepresentation in serious crime. But their race makes them no less likely to be a danger if allowed to remain hands free.

The most serious outcome of civilian-police encounters is lethal violence, resulting in either the death of the civilian or the death of an officer. Fortunately, the latter is a rare occurrence these days; however police officers in the United States kill approximately a thousand civilians annually. According to Mapping Police Violence (based on police data, the Washington Post, and the website Fatal Encounters), around 97 percent of these deaths result from shootings. Most of those shot by the police are armed and the majority of those killed are male—96 percent in 2020, according to the Washington Post (see my blog The Police are Sexist, too).

Whites make up the largest proportion of those shot by the police, approximately half of the total number, with blacks and Hispanics in roughly equal proportions representing the other half of fatalities. Since many sources (the Washington Post/Fatal Encounters) mix ethnicity and race, and since most Hispanics are racially white, the proportion of whites killed, if ethnicity is abstracted out, becomes larger. In other words, in terms of frequencies, whites are far more likely to be shot and killed by the police than are blacks or nonwhite Hispanics, a fact that might surprise the reader given the message pumped out by the culture and media industries. The reader might ask himself: why would the media systematically hide this fact from the public? The answer is that it follows from the logic of the racial animosity project.

Note the large number of unknowns for years 2021 and 2022. Data are still being analyzed for these years (and 2022 is not yet over). There is no reason to believe the pattern will deviate from the one the previous years established.

To be sure, black males, constituting around six percent of the US population, are, at around between a quarter and a third of the total number, overrepresented among those who are killed by the police. But, as I will explain in this blog, this is not because of racist white cops, but rather a consequence of black overrepresentation in serious crime and situational factors, such the threat posed to police officers by the actions of those with whom they come in contact.

The systemic misrepresentation of the facts has had a massive impact on public perceptions. For example, contrary to the widespread belief, with one survey finding a large percentage of blacks and white progressives believing the police kill a thousand or more unarmed blacks annually, fatal police shootings of unarmed blacks number around 22 per year. Isn’t any number of unarmed fatalities too many? Perhaps. However it’s worth keeping in mind that the category “unarmed” is misleading given that hands and feet are prehistorically the first weapons men utilized in violent encounters with other men. Hundreds of deaths occur every year in the United States from hands and feet, or “personal weapons.” In fact, in 2020, FBI crime statistics found that 662 homicides were committed with personal weapons. That’s more people than were killed by rifles that year. And the most important point to emphasize here is that the police do not kill a thousand of more unarmed blacks every year.

Zack Goldberg “How the Media Led the Great Racial Awakening,” Tablet (8/4/2020)

The prevailing progressive narrative about the police is behind the surrounding moral panic. In a recent article by Justin T. Pickett, Amanda Graham, and Francis T. Cullen, “The American Racial Divide in Fear of the Police,” published in Criminology in January of this year, a review of surveys finds that about four in 10 blacks report being “very afraid” of being killed by the police, a statistic that is roughly twice the share of black respondents who reported being “very afraid” of being murdered by criminals, a statistically much greater risk, as well as about four times the share of whites who reported being “very afraid” of being killed by the police. In a survey conducted by Eric Kaufmann of the Manhattan Institute in April of last year, eight in 10 blacks believed that young black men were more likely to be shot to death by police than to die in a car accident. It feels condescending to even have to report that the risk of dying in a car accident is much greater than being shot by the police (but I guess I have to).

I recently experienced firsthand the fear progressive misinformation generates. At a recent conference held in Nashville on issues concerning the black community, where I presented an analysis on these numbers (similar to the one presented in this blog), a panelist, Debbie Griffith, affiliated with the University of Central Florida, shared her doctoral work, “Lessons My Parents Taught Me: The Cultural Significance of ‘The Talk’ within the Black Family,” concerning that moment wherein black parents and community members sit down young black boys and teach them how to behave when interacting with cops as a life-saving exercise, instructions that come with the claim that cops are racist and see black males as a criminal threat (she used videos from Trevor Noah’s The Daily Show on Comedy Central to illustrate). An audience member pointed out that white families also have a version of the talk, since it is widely understood that cops have a dangerous job and assume males of any race or ethnicity are a potential threat (see Jerome Skolnick’s pioneering work on the “symbolic assailant” in Justice Without Trial). But there is a difference, the audience member noted: the talk in white families is not racialized.

The expected rebuttal is that it doesn’t have to be racialized for whites because cops aren’t racist against whites. However, given that there is no evidence that cops are racist or that black males are any more likely to be shot by cops than white males after taking into account benchmarks, such as proportional involvement in serious crime, as well as situational factors, for example pointing a gun at an officer or rushing officers with a knife, the function of the talk in black families is to socialize young black males with a false perception of police officers, a perception that likely leads some black males to behave more aggressively towards police officers. (This is a trend that police officers have not only taken in stride, but has led to their being less likely to escalate force on their end compared to similar encounters with white civilians, who, again, despite being much less likely to be involved in serious crime, account for most deaths at the hands of police officers.)

Again, I want to be clear, there are racial disparities when fatal police shootings are viewed in relation to population. The most common explanations for these, as well as other disparities in the criminal justice system, are implicit race bias and systemic racism. I’m sure readers have heard as truth the facts that racial bias is woven into the system and its institutions, in addition to existing in the minds of officers, prosecutors, judges, and juries, and that systemic racism, the complex of institutional arrangements, structures, and systems that disadvantages blacks and other minorities, is a serious problem in American society and across the West. However, these claims are unsupported by the evidence.

The problem of racial bias in civilian police encounters has been extensively studied. I want to mention two that highlight the problem with disproportionality and perceptions of bias before moving on to the hot-button issue of fatal police encounters. See The Problematic Premise of Black Lives Matter.)

Charles Epp, Steven Maynard-Moody, and Donald Haider-Markel’s 2014 Pulled Over: How Police Stops Define Race and Citizenship, finds that, of drivers stopped by police, many of these stops constituting investigatory stops with neither reasonable suspicion nor probable cause to justify them (what we used to call “aggressive patrolling”), the proportion of racial minorities is almost double that of whites. Using traffic stops to get around Fourth Amendment law is a serious problem, and there definitely needs to be reform in this regard, but racial disparities in such stops—or in anything else in life—is not evidence of racism.

To illustrate, as I point out in The Police are Sexist, too that males are overrepresented in police shootings compared to females. In 2020, men were more than 25 times more likely to be shot and killed than women. “Are we to conclude from this that police are therefore sexist? Of course not. No one would assume that police are biased towards men and therefore more likely to shoot and kill them. No one assumes this because it’s immediately obvious that males are overrepresented in serious crime, whereas females are underrepresented.” I go on to elaborate the point: “male overrepresentation in serious crime causes men to interact with police more frequently than women and, as result, the risk of a lethal encounter with police officers is greater for men than women.”

Jack Glaser, in Suspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Racial Profiling, also published in 2014, contends that, while implicit stereotyping is not racism but an aspect of normal cognition (this was suggested decades before by Skolnick), it is nonetheless harmful and undesirable. In response to these and other findings, implicit bias training programs have been stood up across the nation to develop officer awareness of how attitudes and actions contribute to demographic disparities in the administration of the law. The body of research assessing these programs is not encouraging.

One of the difficulties with arguments from implicit race bias and systemic racism is that claims made on these grounds often take as evidence unexplained variation in racial differences, treating these as indicators of racism. Perhaps this is partially understandable given the difficulty in accessing the interior mental states of officers and criminal justice practitioners and the abstractness of notions of systems. However, it means that conclusions are the work of interpretations that rest, especially on notions of implicit racism, on unfalsifiable assumptions and circularity, where the fact of disparity become evidence of the cause of disparity. On the other hand, if disparities can be accounted for by other factors, the claims of systemic racism become increasingly untenable. 

Heather Mac Donald usefully summarizes the literature on this problem in an article “Are We All Unconscious Racists?” published in the City Journal in fall 2017. She cites Joshua Correll, a psychologist at the University of Colorado studying police decisions to discharge their weapon, who finds that officers are slightly quicker to identify an armed black target as armed than an armed white target and slower to identify an unarmed black target as unarmed than an unarmed white target. However, Correll does not find that officers are more likely to shoot an unarmed black target than an unarmed white one. Mac Donald summarizes, “faster cognitive processing speeds for stereotype-congruent targets (i.e., armed blacks and unarmed whites) do not result in officers shooting unarmed black targets at a higher rate than unarmed white ones.”

Mac Donald wonders whether different reaction times might be attributable to the fact that “black males have made up 42 percent of all cop-killers over the last decade, though they are only 6 percent of the population” or the fact that “individuals involved in the daily drive-by shootings in American cities are overwhelmingly black.” For Mac Donald these are rhetorical questions. Indeed, as I will note below, according to FBI data, black males are responsible for roughly half of all homicides in the United States. Blacks are even more overrepresented in robbery. In light of the statistics, I argue in my essay “Mapping the Junctures of Social Class and Racial Caste” that it is not police racism that causes black overrepresentation in crime, but rather black overrepresentation in police statistics is a consequence of black overrepresentation in the types of crime on which the police focus.  

Even more damning to the implicit race bias claim than Correll’s failure to show that indications of bias explain police decisions to shoot civilians is Washington State professor Lois James’s finding that officers waited longer before shooting an armed black target than an armed white target and, moreover, were three times less likely to shoot an unarmed black target than an unarmed white target. James hypothesizes that, because of the contemporary racial climate surrounding policing, officers second-guess themselves when confronting black suspects. This finding provides evidence for Dotson’s Ferguson effect. As readers will see in a moment, economic Ronald Fryer theorizes that the consequences of shooting suspects obviates any racial bias they may harbor.

Awareness of the problem of racial disparities in the criminal justice system is long standing. William Wilbanks, in The Myth of a Racist Criminal Justice System, published in 1986, produced a comprehensive survey of contemporary research studies, searching for evidence of discrimination by police, prosecutors, judges, and prison and parole officers, finding that, although individual cases of racial prejudice and discrimination do occur in the system, there is insufficient evidence to support a charge of systematic racism against blacks in the criminal justice system. “At every point, from arrest to parole,” Wilbanks concludes, “there is little or no evidence of an overall racial effect.” Robert Sampson and Janet L. Lauritsen’s 1997 comprehensive review of studies of the criminal justice system, a metanalysis published in Crime and Justice, also finds “little evidence that racial disparities result from systematic, overt bias.” In the early 1980s, Joan Petersilia of the RAND corporation came to a similar conclusion.

Doubts about the claims of racial bias and systemic raised were raised anew in 2016 with the high-profile publication of Mac Donald’s book. Her book was followed by Harvard economist Roland Fryer’s 2019 paper, “An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force,” published in the Journal of Political Economy, available much earlier as a preprint (2018) and a working paper (2016). The New York Times covered the working paper in a 2016 article, so the findings were widely available well before the summer months of 2020.

Must read paper: Fryer’s 2019 article, “An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force,” published in the Journal of Political Economy.

While finding unexplained disparities in nonlethal civilian-police encounters involving force (which supports Epp and associates’ thesis), when turning his attention to the most extreme use of force, i.e., officer-involved shootings, Fryer found no racial differences in either the raw data or when contextual factors are considered. Fryer argues that the patterns in the data are consistent with a model in which police officers are utility maximizers. Fryer suggests that lethal force carries costs great enough to deter officers from using the highest level of force at their disposal.

Fryer is hardly alone in his failure to find racist patterns in lethal police shootings In 2018, psychologist Joseph Cesario and colleagues, in Social Psychological and Personality Science, found, adjusting for crime, no systematic evidence of anti-black disparities in fatal shootings, fatal shootings of unarmed citizens, or fatal shootings involving misidentification of harmless objects. The authors concluded that, when analyzing all shootings, exposure to police, given crime rate differences, accounts for the higher per capita rate of fatal police shootings for blacks. The fact pattern indicating exposure: at least half of homicides and more than half of robberies in America are attributable to black males. Moreover, black males account for some one-third of other serious crimes (aggravated assault, burglary).

David Johnson, Cesario, and others, in the pages of the 2019 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, refer to the effect of rates of violent crime as the “exposure hypothesis,” i.e., that serious criminal activity increases the likelihood of officer-civilian encounters, and this influences the frequency of policing shootings. The evidence Johnson and associates used in their study indicate that, taking crime rates into account, the bias in shootings actually appears to be against whites. 

In a study published in Journal of Crime and Justice, also in 2019, Brandon Tregle and colleagues, when focusing on violent crime arrests or weapons offense arrests, found that blacks appear less likely to be fatally shot by police officers. Rutgers’ Charles Menifield and colleagues found, in a study published in Public Administration Review in 2019 that, although minority suspects are disproportionately killed by police, white officers appear to be no more likely to use lethal force against minorities than nonwhite officers. Most people killed by police are armed at the time of their fatal encounter, and more than two-thirds possess a gun.

Public safety is a quality-of-life issue. Serious crime falls hardest on the poor and working class, especially black and brown people. The most recent statistics on homicide find that 8,543 blacks were murdered compared to 5,498 whites. On the offender side, 7,875 murders were black compared to 4,905 whites. Consider that the vast majority of murderers are male and black males are only six percent of the population—black males are responsible for well over half of all murders, as well as account for well over half of the victims. Again, such prominent Democrats as Hillary Clinton are openly lying about all this by substituting for the statistics that condemn their policies irrelevant state-level statistics; serious crime is an urban problem. What else do we hear from them? Black lives matter. It doesn’t look like it, doesn’t it? 

Source: FBI

Black males are drastically overrepresented in robbery offender statistics, as well, Here we see a different victim profile along both lines of race and gender. However, although there are more white victims of robbery than black victims—79,566 to 43,164 respectively), there are disproportionately more black victims of robbery relative to population. At the same time, on the offender side, 93,252 robbers were black compared to 44,946. These are the numbers that explain the disproportionality in black civilians in fatal police encounters—and why some studies find the unexplained bias actually running in the opposite direction from that claims by progressives.

Source: FBI

Progressives cannot claim to speak for working people while undermining public safety. Ask yourself, why aren’t the progressives who run these cities working to fix the criminogenic conditions that disproportionately affect the marginal communities under their control? Why are they depolicing knowing that doing so makes these communities more dangerous, especially for the most vulnerable? Do not reason and compassion demand that, instead of rationalizing the situation in a manner that perpetuates crime and misery, and falsely accuses cops of racism, that those who claim to speak for marginalized populations would work to identify and solve the problems plaguing black people, the problems of idleness, dependency, fatherlessness, and mass immigration?

Chuck Schumer Blames Open Borders on Native Workers Not Breeding

In calling for amnesty for the tens of millions of persons who illegally reside in the United States, Senator Chuck Schumer, Democrat from New York, said, “We have a population that is not reproducing on its own with the same level that it used to. The only way we’re going to have a great future in America is if we welcome and embrace immigrants, the Dreamers and all of them, because our ultimate goal is to help the Dreamers but to get a path to citizenship for all 11 million or however many undocumented there are here” (emphases mine).

For years, Schumer and the Democrats have dodged the truth about their position with respect to illegal immigration—that they want to legalize anyone who has crossed our borders for any reason, including those who overstay their visas. Now they’re admitting it: the Democratic Party does not really believe in national sovereignty. Why?

Schumer admits in his remarks that the path of citizenship for illegal immigrants is about legitimizing the strategy of replacing native workers with cheap foreign labor. Domestically, every year, half a trillion dollars is transferred from the native-born working class of the United States of America to the capitalist class in wages, wages that otherwise would have been paid to native and resident workers to meet their needs.

But there is also a political goal. That the District of Columbia City Council voted overwhelmingly last month to advance a bill that would allow non-citizens to vote in local elections telegraphs the goal: Democrats want to expand the voting base with immigrants because they believe those given amnesty and a path to citizenship will vote for them (see The Democratic Party and the Doctrine of Multiculturalism). If you call our Democrats for this, they will smear you as nativist, racist, and xenophobe (see Smearing Labor as Racist: The Globalist Project to Discredit the Working Class).

But who is the racist here? Has anybody mentioned to Chuck and his party that the millions of black Americans who sit idle in the progressive-run cities suffering from crime, disorder, and inter-generational poverty? Jobs and marriage are the two greatest factors in establishing the conditions necessary for leading a law-abiding life—and this effect works across generations. It’s not native workers failing to hit some theoretical replacement number by not breeding (think about what Schumer is saying). Corporate state policies pushed by the Party for decades have driven millions of blacks out of the workforce and replaced them with foreign labor. You have seen this with your own eyes. The statistical findings confirm your perception.

How about instead of open borders, which will only encourage more migration, we secure our borders, massively invest in neighborhoods devastated by globalization, re-shore industrial production, provide jobs for black men, and start rebuilding the black family? That would be the right thing to do. But doing the right thing is bad for Democrats because doing the right is bad for the oligarchy.

Truth, Reality, and the Authentic Self

“You are a king, then!” said Pilate. Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.” “What is truth?” retorted Pilate…. John 18:37-38

Composer and conductor Joseph Curiale once said, “If you’re not living your truth, you’re living a lie.” This is a profoundly glib line. Indeed, to live one’s truth is to live a lie. One only lives in truth when one lives in the world we share together. Yet we are inundated with pretension slogans in the spirit of Curiale’s. Go to Google Images and search “My truth” and you will see what I mean.

Not everything is a construct. God “exists” because human beings do not have the power to transcend death or become angels, and God is, in the final analysis, the projection of a human’s desire to do the things he cannot do or be things he cannot be. One only imagines eternal life. One only wishes to be an angel.

The man would need no God personally if he had the power to construct anything he wished, if he could live forever or become an angel. To be sure, he can construct some things. He may build a church, for example. He may also construct imaginaries—he may construct in the minds of people false realities with the words and phrases he uses. (It will help if he is charismatic or has power at his back.) But he can be anything he wants. Reality limits him.

Jesus before Pilate before his death

That reality limits the man is no reason to despair. Obstacles may be overcome. But they cannot be overcome by pretense. They have to be overcome through ingenuity, through science and technology. Yet, even here, there are obstacles that cannot be transcended (and are therefore not really obstacles but rather essentials and inevitables, such mortality).

Language has many purposes. It can describe reality, organize reality, and manufacture illusions and simulations that appear as reality. But the external world remains real independent of the words and phrases the man uses for any of these purposes. Our minds can make illusions seem real; they cannot make illusions real.

It is an utterly false and, in practice, quite pernicious notion that reduces ontology to epistemology—that is, to confuse what is in the world with what the man thinks or says about the world. Whatever he thinks or says, the man lives in the same reality you and I do, even if he is delusional. He is certainly free to insist that he determines his own reality and that it is valid; but, in a free world, we do not have to live in his reality. We have our reality to live in and we must insist that we free to live in it. And, ultimately, he lives in our reality and, at points in his life, we must force him to.

Not every idea or claim is equal in soundness and validity. Not every claim represents reality or makes logical sense. Not every idea or claim is to be accepted or affirmed. It doesn’t matter what a person believes about himself, or what he says about himself—or what he says about us. What matters is what he does and what he is.

The terrifying thing about the notion that what one claims about the world is “his truth,” as if what is true fundamentally is not also fundamentally true for everyone, and that, to be “inclusive,” “his truth” is to be not merely tolerated but accepted, even embraced, is that we are being asked to dwell in the illusions of others, to affirm “their truths,” affirmations that require that we negate our commitment to the shared truth of our reality—or at least to pretend as if we do and live in bad faith.

Is it not obvious that this is a massive exercise in gas lighting? The man is telling us to doubt our reality—the reality that came before us and will survive us as individuals and collectively. No justice is possible in the world the man wants us to live in. Only tyranny. Human rights evaporates with the claim that each person’s perception of the world is sound and valid. Such an idea is the work of sociopaths.

Indeed, these sociopaths themselves cannot abide by the claim that every idea and practice is sound and valid. If this were true, then we wouldn’t see the corporate state apparatus mobilized to compel a nation to overthrow the reality it knows for the illusions of elites and their functionaries and pawns. We wouldn’t see Antifa thugs beating up women’s rights advocates in a public park.

The truth of authentic life is not the principle that what the man thinks of himself is to be taken as reality, but that one reality must prevail for all of us. Determining which reality to live in is a rather obvious choice since there is only one.

Growing up, I used to hear people say, “The truth shall set you free.” Tragically, there are people who believe that freedom requires escaping truth. Maybe they don’t know that’s what they’re doing because they have been told the value of “their truth.” But that is what they are doing. Why should it be expected of any of us too help the deluded perpetuate their delusions?

Misleading on Mass Shootings and a Note on the Biosecurity State

It’s interesting how a mass shooting is made out by progressives and the corporate state to be the work of “homophobes” and “transphobes” or “white supremacists” and “MAGA” until they discover that the identity of the shooter doesn’t fit the narrative. Then they fall back to the generic anti-gun rhetoric.

Most recently, at Club Q, a gay bar in Colorado Springs, on the eve of Transgender Day of Remembrance, a 22-year old named opened fire on those gathered there, killing five and wound more than a dozen others. Attorneys for the the shooter, identified as Anderson Lee Aldrich, have alerted the court and the media that Aldrich identifies as nonbinary, goes by “them/they” pronouns, and wishes to be addressed as “Mx. Aldrich.”

Of course, Aldrich has their skeptics.

This was not the first of Aldrich’s run-ins with the law. “In 2021 Aldrich was arrested after an incident in which their mother accused them of threatening her with a homemade bomb,” according to TVP World in an essay about what the publication calls “self-hate crime.” “Law enforcement managed to pacify Aldrich, who throughout the incident was live-streaming a video on Facebook in which they threatened to detonate the bomb.”

As soon as I learned about this case, I asked my Facebook friend why this man was not already in jail or prison or a psychiatric institution speaks to the failure of the criminal justice system to provide adequate public safety to citizens and residents of this nation. The case from last year wasn’t even adjudicated—had it been, it is possible this deranged man would have not been in a position to carry out these heinous acts.

However, if you open Google News aggregator today, you will find that the Club Q shooting is no longer the lead story. This is not accidental. I’m always telling people to look for causes. After all, guns don’t shoot themselves. But progressives only “find” causes in actions they can attach to an argument they don’t like. When the identity of the perpetrator is inconvenient, they shift the narrative or drop the story.

Remember the Pulse nightclub shooting? When a Muslim murdered 49 individuals in a gay club in Orlando, Florida? As soon as elites found out that the shooter was an Islamist, they changed the subject. Hell, they were loathe to make reference to it in the wake of the Club Q shooting. (See No Muslim Ever Called Me Faggot and Other Nonsense; Everything Progressives Say About Mass Shootings is Wrong … and Racist; The Courage to Name the Problem.)

Look at how different progressives treated the rampant violence in America over the summer of 2020, violence that cost billions of dollars and dozens of lives, or all the violence that occurred in the wake of Donald Trump’s election—and compare these to what happened on January 6, 2021. Progressives will even lie and say that cops were killed by the January 6th mob. The icing on that cake is the sudden concern for racist Blue Lives.

* * *

Fifty-eight percent of coronavirus deaths in August were people who were vaccinated or boosted, according to an analysis conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation. I’m glad I didn’t take that vaccine. There were plenty of authoritarians who were prepared to force me to, though. I keep notes on all that. I will never forget. No enemy of freedom is a friend of mine. I’ll be pleasant and professional. But I will never look at you the same way.

The vaccines don’t stop transmission of the disease. Therefore, vaccine passports make zero sense. The elites know that. What this means is that vaccine passports were never about disease control but about assimilating you into a transnational ID system. This is the zenith of totalitarianism desire: the biosecurity state—global total control. If you don’t see this, then you have neither studied history nor grasped its lessons.

They failed this time. But they are going to keep trying.

Guns Don’t Shoot Themselves

Responding to a post I wrote recently citing the fact that more people are killed by “personal weapons,” i.e., hands and feet, than by rifles, a friend asked me whether a person could kill fifteen people with their fists. I answered the query this way:

I don’t want to obscure the fact that more people are killed by fists and feet than with rifles. It’s not a small difference. In 2020, 455 people were killed with rifles, whereas 662 were killed with fists and feet. Around 1,500 people are killed every year with knives. Beatings with clubs and other instruments runs pretty close to stabbing numbers. Some of these incidents involve multiple victims. 

A man can in fact beat to death more than one person in the same context (or sequentially over time, something we ought not neglect). Of course, we can’t take away a man’s hands or feet. A man can knife to death more than one person. So should we ban knives?

In 2016, a man in Sagamihara, a town near Tokyo, killed 19 people and wounded another 26 with a knife. In the 2014 Kumming attack, in Yunnan, China, eight assailants stabbed to death 31 people and wounded 141. In 2017, on London Bridge, three assailants stabbed to death eight people and wounded 48. Just this year, in Saskatchewan, on September 4, 2022, two men stabbed 28 people, killing 10 of them. 

Alex Hribal after his arraignment on April 9, 2014. Hribal stabbed 21 students and a security guard at a Pennsylvania high school.

A man can mass murder using a car. We just put away a man for hundreds of years here in the state of Wisconsin for using a car to kill people in a Christmas parade last year. Any instrument is a murder weapon or potential murder weapon in the hands of a man with murderous intent.  

Fortunately, domestically speaking, mass killings involving 15 more people are extremely rare occurrences irrespective of weapon used. Moreover, mass shootings generally (four or more dead or injured in the same spatial and temporal context) are not distributed equally across the country. Most mass shootings occur in minority neighborhoods, most of those committed by black men (2021 was horrifying in that regard). The use of guns to mass murder is largely a phenomenon of gang violence in the inner cities of centralized urban areas. The vast majority of owners of guns, including rifles, are law-abiding citizens who use their rifles to hunt, for sport, and to protect their homes and persons. 

However if one were to say that guns are a problem, then one should take a look at handguns, which are used to commit on average annually more than 6,000 homicides (more lately since violence crime has been rising drastically in the wake of Ferguson). Handguns are the instrument most often used in homicide. 

It is also important to remember that most gun deaths aren’t homicides but suicides (and by a lot). Killing ones self with a handgun is overwhelmingly the choice of those who accomplish suicide. In fact, the discrepancy between the length of the typical individual’s arm relative to trigger and barrel for rifles cause investigators to question suicide as a possibility in those cases. In other words, not many people kill themselves with rifles (most who do rig a mechanism to pull the trigger and why do that when a handgun is uncomplicated).

Finally, guns are the tool most likely to deter assailants. Rifles and handguns have saved many lives. (Turns out that most people shot to death have criminal records, on average multiple arrests or convictions.)

When judging such matters, we should look at the causes of homicide and suicide. The instrument used does not cause either. Guns don’t shoot themselves. Murder is not less frequent in Europe than the United States because of gun availability. Murder is more frequent in the United States for the reasons identified above. America is unusual among advanced democratic countries in the level of serious crime, and in those cities where it worse, cities run by progressives, not enough is done to ameliorate the conditions or to protect the residents who live there—residents who are disproportionately black and brown.

Yes, my position on guns has changed over the years albeit not that much. I never supported gun bans. And I do not oppose gun regulations. But gun regulations cannot be of the sort that make it impossible for law-abiding citizens to obtain and possess firearms, including so-called assault rifles.

Nonwhites and Slavery: The Lies Our Teachers Tell Us

Have you read Encyclopedia.com’s entry on Black Slave Owners? The source is Michael Johnson and James Roark’s 1984 Black Masters. See also the history of American Indian Slaveholders. The five “civilized tribes,” the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole Indians, were fully integrated into the capitalist economic system and even assimilated into American settler culture, dressing in European clothing, speaking English, taking up Christianity, and buying and selling black people.

Marie Therese Metoyer was a black woman who owned more than 1,000 acres, with an estimated 287 slaves working the land.

I was never told any of this as a kid growing up or as a man in college—and I have an advanced degrees (including a PhD), so I have have been in a lot of college classrooms. Of course, I knew something about the history. When I have raised the matter with others, slavery practiced by nonwhites is routinely rationalized as a product of the corrupting effects of European colonization. But Africans practiced slavery in Africa before the colonization of Africa. And American Indians tribes held slaves prior to and during European colonization, with the tribes selling other Indians to Europeans (and Africans).

I was, however, told many falsehoods during my childhood, such as the falsehood that the Cherokee’s constitution-based government was the inspiration for the US Constitution only to later learn that it was the other way around. My teachers taught me this at Sequoya Elementary School in Knoxville, Tennessee. I heard this claim elsewhere, as well.

Choctaw chief Greenwood LeFlore owned 15,000 acres of Mississippi land (that’s his Mississippi home) and 400 enslaved Africans. 

Most people I discuss this history with don’t know any of it. Like me, they weren’t taught that black men and women and American Indians owned black people. They were never told that Lincoln’s historic Emancipation Proclamation did not free slaves on Indian lands because Indians were recognized as autonomous nations. The freeing of slaves held by Indians occurred later after extensive negotiations with the United States government—the same government that banned the importation of slaves into North America within two decades of America’s founding, sacrificed perhaps as many as a million Americans, mostly white Americans, to end chattel slavery, and abolished Jim Crow segregation.

Why is this history important to talk about? Does this mean that American Indians and Black Americans living today are responsible for what their ancestors did? Of course not. To suggest they are is an exercise in primitive blood guilt, an ethic that only racist authoritarians would claim to be virtuous. By the same modern rational standard of holding living persons responsible for the things they do while they are living and not for the actions of others living or dead, white Americans living today are not responsible for what their ancestors did, either. That’s why this is important.

Yet children are today taught that slavery was a practice established by white Europeans and for this, and for white supremacy, all whites enjoy a privilege and owe a debt to American Indians and black Americans. Children are not taught that Muslims established the world slave trade that Europeans inherited when world hegemonic power shifted to the trans-Atlantic sphere. Children are not taught that Africans captured and sold Africans to merchants from around the world. I had to learn all this on my own. Children are not taught these things so that the narrative portraying white people as “perpetrators” and American Indians and black Americans as “victims” can be sustained. This is what Critical Race Theory teaches, and its logic has become the basis of woke curricula in public schools.

When you stop and think about it, the facts of what children are taught and what is hidden from them blows up the assumption that white supremacy rules the day. Indeed, it blows up the assumption that white supremacy has been a significant force over at least the last half a century. For if this were a white supremacist nation, why would the education system, largely run by whites, defame white people while ignoring the history of American Indian and black American slavery? If this were a republic fueled by Christian nationalism, as we so often hear today, why is the role of Islam in establishing the world trade in Africans ignored or obscured?

Ironically, the bad history taught to our children betrays the lies teachers are telling them. And told us.

Stepping into Oppression

“The opposite of courage is not cowardice. It’s conformity.” —Earl Nightingale

“We become what we think about.” —Earl Nightingale

In his 1927 book The Future of an Illusion, Sigmund Freud argues that, when a solitary person or small group of persons believe some impossible thing that depends entirely on faith, that is, a feeling and associated belief that cannot be empirically demonstrated to actually exist, such as souls or angels, the person or group is delusional. A delusion, to crib from the Internet, is “an idiosyncratic belief or impression that is firmly maintained despite being contradicted by what is generally accepted as reality or rational argument, typically a symptom of mental disorder.”

However, if millions of people believe this impossible thing, it becomes something different (but not really). It becomes an illusion. Such illusions often appear in the form of religion, where such things as the soul or angels become articles of faith that must be believed.

Since such illusions are, as with their corresponding delusions, contradicted by rational argument or what would otherwise generally be accepted as reality (if but for the illusion), it is imperative to silence those who, like the small boy in Hans Christian Andersen’s 1837 parable The Emperor Has No Clothes, who not only contributed to the mutual knowledge of the emperor’s subjects but also, not yet indoctrinated into habitual practice of denying to the obvious, had to say what everybody already knew: the emperor was naked.

To be sure, the purveyors of the illusion will try to make what appear to be arguments to persuade those around them that their worldview is the true one. The arguments will of course be circular and nonfalsifiable. The power to compel belief ultimately rests on some capacity to command the social machinery (culture, economy, and politics) and thus control people. For Freud, given human nature, such control was probably for the best. Here is where I depart Freud’s company.

* * *

A 2019 blog by Verve blogger and “child empowerment” advocate Chanju Mwanza about transracialist Rachael Dolezal concludes with this: “There is a difference between transitioning into a new gender, which doesn’t harm anyone else, and choosing to live a lie to the detriment of other people who form the oppressed group that you’re so desperate to be a part of. The whole transracial concept embodies white supremacy and the fact that white people can continue to steal from the oppressed, even by pretending to be part of the community itself.”

Similarly, Braden Hill, an aboriginal Australian at Edith Cowan University, writes, “There is a difference between affirming your gender as a trans person and choosing to live and appropriate another culture.” (See “Members can identify as black, disabled or female, university union insists,” The Times.)

Whenever I see attempts to differentiate two phenomena that the author recognizes are intuitively similar, I do a word substitution to see if the argument still works the other way around. In this case, it would look like this: There is a difference between transitioning to a new race, which doesn’t harm anyone else, and choosing to live a lie to the detriment of other people who form the oppressed group that you’re so desperate to be a part of. The whole transgender concept embodies male supremacy and the fact that men can continue to steal from the oppressed, even by pretending to be part of the community itself.

A reader might object that girls and women also adopt new identities, many of them choosing to identify as boys and men. Indeed (and Freud would have something to say about this). And what about those who choose to identify as no gender at all?

Before any reader feels moved to make this objection, know that it ignores that blacks have passed for white in an attempt (some successfully) to escape their oppressed category. Moreover, there are blacks who wish not to identify racially at all.

On this last point, consider Kmele Foster’s argument for racial abolitionism. Glenn Loury puts Foster’s position this way: “Kmele Foster, a ‘Black man’ in terms of what you’d think when you saw him, refuses to call himself a Black man or to think of himself as a ‘Black man’ and abjures the very idea that we’re gonna see each other in these racial terms. He’s for abolishing the categories of race altogether.”

Foster’s argument is indebted to that of historian Barbara Fields and sociologist Karen Fields who, in their book Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in American Life, argue that the practice of racism, which involves reifying racial categories, produces the illusion of race.

What about this claim that transitioning to a new gender doesn’t harm anyone else? There are feminists across the West who are making the case that allowing trans women, who remain male, to enter women (female)-only spaces, such as bathrooms, domestic abuse centers, dressing rooms, locker rooms, and jails and prisoners, is harmful to women, as men use women’s dress as a ruse to put themselves in a position to prey on women (and children). Moreover, trans women use their new status to take advantage of opportunities and draw upon resources traditionally reserved for women in order to advance their own life chances and personal power.

(A growing body of evidence suggests that transitioning to a new gender can harm the individual undergoing the transition. See Episode 138 of Blocked and Reported, “Jon Stewart and John Oliver are Wrong about the Evidence for Puberty Blockers and Hormones” for an in-depth account of the harms associated with transitioning.)

Mwanza makes a number of arguments in her blog. None of them work very well. And, no, I did not pick her blog because it serves as a straw man. I have scoured the Internet for better arguments and have found none.

The so-called “transracialists” have appropriated the word “transracial,” Mwanza claims with some accuracy. Mwanza notes that, originally (and exclusively, in Mwanza’s view), transracial “refers to the act of adopting a child of one race or ethnic group and placing them into a family of a different race or ethnic group.” “Transracial,” she asserts, “speaks to the millions of children who are denied an intimate knowledge of their birth cultures and are constantly torn between their multiple identities by being raised in an environment different to their own racial or ethnic backgrounds.”

This is an odd argument given that ethnicity, defined as a demonstrably but relatively cohesive cultural and linguistic category, is learned. One is not born with an ethnicity (or a religion, etc). To the extent that we can say there are such things as “black” and “white” ethnicities (there is likely a category error here), then black children raised in white neighborhoods by white parents learn white ethnicity.

As for race, is this not a social construct? Are the really such things as races in natural history? Like Foster, Barbara and Karen Fields say no. So does Rachel Dolezal. To be sure, the black child looks different from the white parents, and this is the result of ancestry. But should we define ancestry in terms of race? Is the one-drop rule still in effect? Are we still applying blood quantum rules? (I have written quite a lot on this subject. See, for example, my recent blog What Lies Behind the Popular Reracialization of the Human Population? See also “Race Finished” by Jan Sapp.)

Skirting these important matters, Mwanza assumes that race and ethnicity are rooted in ancestry and therefore cannot be chosen. “Unlike gender, which is assigned to you at birth,” she writes, “your race or ethnicity is rooted in ancestry. You can’t inherit your gender but you do inherit your race. The fact that these people believe that they can pick and choose parts of the ethnicity they want and later decide to revert to their whiteness is white privilege at its worst.”

Sex or gender, whichever term you prefer, is a constellation of genotypic and phenotypic traits with which one is born. But what about blacks who have passed for white and chose or choose to do so? Is that opting into white privilege? Is it also an attempt to escape the oppressive category of blackness?

Given what I noted earlier about race and ethnicity, points on which anthropologists and sociologists generally agree, if ethnicity is cultural and race a social construct, how are these inevitably inherited given the phenomenon of transracial adoption? Race could only be assigned in the continuing presence of what the Fields describe as racecraft.

Moreover, is gender really assigned at birth? Or is it identified by the physician helping to deliver the baby with near 100 percent certainty based on objectively-ascertainable sex characteristics? We have to be careful not to allow the way activists and ideologues put things shape our grasp of reality. It’s not “It’s a boy!” because the physician assigned the label. It’s a boy because the physician, with all her experience, recognizes what it is—and is rarely wrong (as in almost never).

Mwanza claims that the new transracialists enjoy (if we let them) “the option to decide when to carry the burdens and discrimination felt by other races whilst also reaping the ‘benefits’ by taking money from organizations created to empower and help black communities.” She notes that Dolezal benefited financially for her “decision to go through adult life as a black person.” (Can a man benefit financially for his decision to go through adult live as a woman? Somebody should ask Dylan Mulvaney.)

How, if being black is an oppressed category, does a white person benefit from identifying as a member of an oppressed category? Would this not be stepping into oppression? Did Dolezal step out of privilege into oppression? Or did she step into privilege. Others, Mwanza argues, have “benefited financially from the publicity gained by coming out as ‘transracial’. They literally robbed black people of the money they deserved, and yet had the audacity to say it was fair because they ‘felt black’.”

Literally? Money deserved on what grounds? There’s an assumption here. There’s another assumption at work here, as well: that a white person cannot “feel black.” How does Mwanza know that? “Black isn’t something you can just decide to be,” she asserts. “You can’t … put on some makeup and perm your hair and assume that you’re now navigating the world as a black person.” Why not?

How does a man know what it feels like to be a woman? Or a boy a girl? Since we are our bodies, wouldn’t feeling like a woman require the experience of being one? If a woman is an “adult human female,” which has been the objective and noncircular definition in usage for millennia, then an adult human male cannot have such an experience. Knowing what it means to be a woman can only be in his imagination (even if the thought of it is enough to physically arouse some men). To be sure, he can dress like a woman, even surgically alter his body to appear as one (which rarely works), but he cannot be the genotype he isn’t. There’s no alchemy in the world that makes that possible.

Mwanza argues that trans people “don’t choose to be trans, they’re born that way.” (Is there evidence for this?) “Transitioning as a trans person [by which the author presumably means transgender person, since there are many trans category] is a violent, painful and difficult process that can result in job-loss, isolation and rejection.”

Ask Dolezal whether the transition to a black person has been a difficult process, one that resulted in job-loss, isolation, and rejection. Ask Malaika Kubwa, aka Martina Big, a German model and actress known for her “artificial transformation from a caucasian woman to a black woman,” to quote Wikipedia. What Kubwa is going through must be a painful and difficult process.

Rachel Dolezal a trans black woman

For those readers wondering, “Who is Rachel Dolezal?” If you don’t remember her, that’s the white woman who claimed to be a black woman. She still claims to be a black woman, as far as I know. (I have written about Dolezal in the past. See Racecraft and Witch Hunts. The American Humanist Association Tries Cancel Culture and The Strange Essentialisms of Identity Politics for two examples.)

At the time the Dolezal story broke back in 2015 I didn’t think about this piece of it, that, by claiming to be black, Dolezal is able to claim for herself the existential position that she is the victim of racial discrimination and oppression that blacks uniquely suffer as a class (not that other racial minorities do not suffer in their own unique way)—or that this comes with privileges. At least some would say she could claim this or that this was her aim.

As a white person, so the woke ideology goes, Dolezal cannot experience race oppression. But as a black woman, Dolezal steps into oppression. She is at least trying to be an oppressed person. Why? Because, according to Mwanza, there are benefits to being black. I wonder to what extent the benefits of being oppressed was a motivating factor for Dolezal? Claiming the oppression of others on either or both expressive and instrumental grounds does seem to be a possible motive.

But there’s another form of oppression Dolezal steps into. To the extent that people don’t believe Dolezal is really black, she can also claim to be the victim of discrimination against transracial persons, which is a growing phenomenon across the West. Denying the concept of biological race, Dolezal does claim to be “transracial.” (See Adolph Reed, Jr.’s “From Jenner to Dolezal: One Trans Good, the Other Not So Much.”)

* * *

I looked today for more about how Dolezal sees these matters and found an interview from March 2017 in Contexts by Ann Morning. Asked about the constant question put to Dolezal about how she identifies, Dolezal said, “I get fatigued by the overly simplistic race labels… Yes, Black is the closest descriptive race or culture category that represents the essential essence of who I am, and I stand unapologetically on the ‘Black side’ of the racially constructed Black/White divide. But, if I could choose a more complex label with my own terms, it might be ‘A pro-Black, Pan-African, bisexual artist, activist, and mother.’

“Most people on the street would likely feel that description is more confusing than helpful, so finding where I fit amid the binary language of our current race-based society, I could say ‘A Black woman born to White parents,’ or, if I was allowed to use a newer term (also since my parents don’t define me), I would prefer ‘A TransBlack woman.’”

Clearly, Dolezal sees herself as transracial in the new (or fallacious, according to her critics) meaning of the term. She describes her feeling as “instinctually” black and finds that feeling as “beautiful and inspirational.” “I didn’t know how to articulate that this was ‘me’ except in my drawings and playtime as a child,” she explains; “and from there I learned what was—and wasn’t—socially acceptable about how I felt.”

In describing her transitions, she says, “It felt like a long journey home. I started far away, and it just kept calling to me until I found my way fully there. Of course, feeling like I was then evicted in a sense in 2015 was painful. But it’s still home to me.”

“I connected the idea of race as a social construct with the philosophy of leaders like Dick Gregory who said that ‘White isn’t a race, it’s a state of mind.’ I knew White wasn’t my state of mind, and this gave me permission to stop repressing and be exactly who I am,” she tells the interviewer. “Whiteness feels foreign to me. It was, awkwardly, how people saw me when I was a child and how some people see me now, so I have to interact with that disconnect at times. The very idea of Whiteness, upon which the worldview of race was built, established the propaganda of White as righteous, pure, and superior. I reject this worldview and am not a member of, as James Balwin called them, ‘people who think they’re White.’”

Here is a useful exchange from the interview:

AM: Do you think there is a parallel between your racial self-identification and the gender self-identification of Caitlyn Jenner, who was heavily featured in the news at the same time as you were?

RD: Inasmuch as we were both categorized at birth as something other than what we felt—and some people will always see both of us as our birth category and nothing further—there is a parallel. I think courage and some degree of harmonizing the outer body with the inner self so people visually identify us, how we identify ourselves would be a commonality as well. There is absolutely no parallel when it comes to financial resources, which are a real factor for cushioning a nontraditional self-identity; there we part ways as super-rich versus single mom barely surviving. And there’s the difference of stigma, with gender fluidity being more widely accepted than race fluidity at this moment in history. Mainstream media didn’t shame Caitlyn in the same way I was shamed. My son, Franklin, asked me how race didn’t become fluid first, with science proving time and again it is not a biological reality. It’s a good question.

AM: What do you think of the term “transracial”?

RD: I think the former use of “transracial,” describing kids who were born with a different race label than the family they grew up in (usually via adoption) wasn’t widely known enough before 2015. So, with the spotlight on Caitlyn Jenner and then me in short succession, many people began using it to describe me, as if “transracial” was a new word and I was the front-runner of a movement. In a literal sense, I don’t like the word, because it would be like saying “transhuman” to anyone who accepts that race is fiction. And yet, if that is a term that helps people understand or is useful in creating awareness and empathy for people with a plural race identity, then I’m fine with it as a starting point. I really don’t feel like it’s up to me to decide what the word should or will mean.

The Rachel Dolezal case is an interesting case sociologically. It’s not the only case. Besides her and Kubwa, there are, among many others, Jessica Krug, a woman born to white parents who passed as black, Ja Du, a trans woman who was born to white parents and identifies as Filipina, and Old London, a white person who identifies as Korean. One wonders whether the public shaming of such individuals will deter others from following this path. I expect it won’t.

What’s at Stake Tuesday

Hillary Clinton says voters don’t fully appreciate the consequences of voting GOP on Tuesday. I think they do. Republicans, especially the populists set to take over the party, or at least push it back towards its mid-nineteenth century roots, are better—much, much better—than Democrats on a range of issues: crime, culture, economy, education, immigration, medicine, and foreign policy. I will expand on some of those issues in this blog, but I will spend most of my words on the question of crime.

It’s obvious to attentive and compassionate Americans that standing down police and prosecutors and implementing various reforms, such as cashless bail, has compromised the criminal justice system’s ability to control serious deviant behavior; as a consequence, the United States is now experiencing a wave of crime, an increase that comes after decades of significant reductions in criminal offending—reductions that resulted largely from the vast expansion of the criminal justice apparatus in the early 1990s.

How serious is the crime problem? According to National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, between 2020 and 2021, violent crime incidents and offenses increased 29 and 27.5 percent respectively. Homicide for both increased by more than 40 percent. Robbery by 18 percent. Rape incidents and offenses by 38 and 37 percent respectively. Property-crime incidents and offenses 22 percent and 21 percent respectively. 

Taking a longer view, we can date the upward trend in serious crime to the year of Ferguson, the moment that decades of manufacturing of mass (false) belief in systemic racism found its poster child in Michael Brown. “Hands up.” (See Demoralization and the Ferguson Effect: What the Left and Right Get Right (and Wrong) About Crime and Violence.)

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Clinton, who you will recall referred to black youth in the 1990s as “super predators,” claimed recently that red states are as bad for homicide as blue states. Wrong unit of analysis. Crime is worst in cities run by progressive Democrats. In fact, of the 30 American cities with the highest murder rates, 27 have Democratic mayors—and at least 14 Soros-backed prosecutors, with many more prosecutors politically progressive and sympathetic to the woke line.

As alluded to earlier, the increase in crime is not only because Democrats have weakened the criminal justice response; Democrats have given young black men and women permission to commit crime as reparations-in-kind. (See Is There Systemic Anti-White Racism?)

Over the last decade, the corporate state media, legitimizing its propaganda by appealing to the expertise of the progressional and managerial strata, functionaries (or effectively so) ensconced in academic institutions, and grievance merchants standing up activist organizations, have pursued a campaign to convince Americans that the nation is shot through with racism and that whites are to blame.

Zack Goldberg “How the Media Led the Great Racial Awakening,” Tablet (8/4/2020)

With the crackpot academic construction critical race theory in back of their public messaging, woke progressives aggressively disseminate the falsehoods promulgated by the corrupt Black Lives Matter campaign, myths such as that cops prowling America’s inner cities looking for young black men to murder. (For more on BLM, see What’s Really Going On with #BlackLivesMatter; Corporations Own the Left. Black Lives Matter Proves it.)

Here’s the empirical reality: According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Police-Public Contact Survey, around 60 million residents 16 years of age and older report having at least one contact with police annually. It might surprise you to learn the number is that large. In fact, it’s much larger than that, given that many individuals reporting contact have more than one encounter with the police in a year. What this means is that, with the US population at more than 330 million citizens and residents (with tens of millions more here illegally), the police have their hands full.

It might also surprise you (given media coverage) that most contacts involve white civilians, with females slightly more likely to experience contact with a police officer than males. However, males (at around 3 percent) are more likely than females (around 1 percent) to experience threats of use of force. A higher percentage of blacks (around 3 percent) and Hispanics (also around 3 percent) are likely to report experiencing threats or use of force than whites (at around 2 percent). Around 4 percent of blacks and the same percent of Hispanics report having been cuffed during contact, compared to around 2 percent of whites and other races.

That cuffing is reported as the most common use of force when force is reported is a significant fact. Cuffing has become routine at agencies because of the risk to officers when detainees and arrestees have their hands free. This change in policy has contributed to a significant reduction in death and injury occurring to police officers. (It’s a workplace safety issue.) The negative public perception around routine cuffing is driven by the fact that blacks and Hispanics are more likely to come into contact with police given the overrepresentation in serious crime.

The worst outcome of civilian-police encounters is lethal violence, resulting in either the death of the civilian or the death of an officer. The latter is a rare occurrence these days, however police officers in the United States kill approximately a thousand civilians annually.

According to Mapping Police Violence (based on police data, the Washington Post, and the website Fatal Encounters), around 97 percent of deaths result from shootings. Most of those shot by the police are armed and the majority of those killed are male—96 percent in 2020, according to the Washington Post (see my blog The Police are Sexist, too).

According to numerous sources, whites make up the largest proportion of those shot by the police, approximately half of the total number, with blacks and Hispanics in roughly equal proportions representing the other half of fatalities. Since many sources (the Washington Post/Fatal Encounters) mix ethnicity and race, and since most Hispanics are racially white, the proportion of whites killed, if ethnicity is abstracted out, becomes larger. 

Again, these facts might surprise the reader given the message pumped out by the culture and media industries. To be sure, black males, constituting around six percent of the US population, are overrepresented among those who are killed by the police (at around between a quarter and a third of the total number). However, contrary to the popular perceptions, for example one survey finding a large percentage of blacks and white progressives believing the police kill a thousand or more unarmed blacks annually, fatal police shootings of unarmed blacks number around 22 per year (the number is much larger for unarmed whites).

Isn’t any number of unarmed fatalities too many? The category “unarmed” is misleading given that hands and feet are prehistorically the first weapons men utilized in violent encounters with other men. Hundreds of deaths occur every year in the United States from hands and feet, or “personal weapons.” In fact, in 2020, FBI crime statistics found that 662 homicides were committed with personal weapons. That’s more people than were killed by rifles that year.

Zack Goldberg “How the Media Led the Great Racial Awakening,” Tablet (8/4/2020)

The prevailing woke progressive narrative has very real effects. In a recent article by Justin T. Pickett, Amanda Graham, and Francis T. Cullen, “The American Racial Divide in Fear of the Police,” published in Criminology in January of this year, a review of surveys finds that about four in 10 blacks report being “very afraid” of being killed by the police, a statistic that is roughly twice the share of black respondents who reported being “very afraid” of being murdered by criminals, a statistically much greater risk, as well as about four times the share of whites who reported being “very afraid” of being killed by the police.

In a survey conducted by Eric Kaufmann of the Manhattan Institute in April of last year, eight in 10 blacks believed that young black men were more likely to be shot to death by police than to die in a car accident. The risk of dying in a car accident is much greater than being shot by the police.

At a recent conference held in Nashville on issues concerning the black community, where I presented an analysis on these numbers, a panelist, Debbie Griffith, affiliated with the University of Central Florida, shared her doctoral work, “Lessons My Parents Taught Me: The Cultural Significance of ‘The Talk’ within the Black Family,” concerning that moment wherein black parents and community members sit down young black boys and teach them how to behave when interacting with cops as a life-saving exercise, instructions that come with the claim that cops are racist and see black males as a criminal threat (she used videos from Trevor Noah’s The Daily Show on Comedy Central to illustrate). An audience member pointed out that white families also have a version of the talk, since it is widely understood that cops have a dangerous job and assume males of any race or ethnicity are a potential threat (see Jerome Skolnick’s pioneering work on the “symbolic assailant” in Justice Without Trial). But there is a difference, the audience member noted: the talk in white families is not racialized.

The expected rebuttal is that it doesn’t have to be racialized for whites because cops aren’t racist against whites. However, given that there is no evidence that cops are racist or that black males are any more likely to be shot by cops than white males after taking into account benchmarks, such as proportional involvement in serious crime, as well as situational factors, for example pointing a gun at an officer or rushing officers with a knife, the function of the talk in black families is to socialize young black males with a false perception of police officers, a perception that leads many black males to behave more aggressively towards police officers—a trend that police officers have not only taken in stride, but has led to their being less likely to escalate force on their end compared to similar encounters with white civilians, who, again, despite being much less likely to be involved in serious crime, account for most deaths at the hands of police officers.

Again, there are racial disparities when viewed in relation to population. The most common explanations for these, as well as other disparities in the criminal justice system, are implicit race bias and systemic racism. I’m sure readers have heard as truth the facts that racial bias is woven into the system and its institutions, in addition to existing in the minds of officers, prosecutors, judges, and juries, and that systemic racism, the complex of institutional arrangements, structures, and systems that disadvantages blacks and other minorities, is a serious problem in American society and across the West. However, these claims are unsupported by the evidence.

The problem of racial bias in civilian police encounters has been extensively studied. I want to mention two that highlight the problem with disproportionality and perceptions of bias before moving on to the hot-button issue of fatal police encounters.

Charles Epp, Steven Maynard-Moody, and Donald Haider-Markel’s 2014 Pulled Over: How Police Stops Define Race and Citizenship, finds that, of drivers stopped by police, many of these stops constituting investigatory stops with neither reasonable suspicion nor probable cause to justify them (what we used to call “aggressive patrolling”), the proportion of racial minorities is almost double that of whites. Using traffic stops to get around Fourth Amendment law is a serious problem, and there definitely needs to be reform in this regard, but racial disparities in such stops—or in anything else in life—is not evidence of racism.

To illustrate, as I write in The Police are Sexist, too, “males are overrepresented in police shootings compared to females. In 2020, men were more than 25 times more likely to be shot and killed than women…. Are we to conclude from this that police are therefore sexist? Of course not. No one would assume that police are biased towards men and therefore more likely to shoot and kill them. No one assumes this because it’s immediately obvious that males are overrepresented in serious crime, whereas females are underrepresented.” I go on to elaborate the point: “male overrepresentation in serious crime causes men to interact with police more frequently than women and, as result, the risk of a lethal encounter with police officers is greater for men than women.”

Jack Glaser, in Suspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Racial Profiling, also published in 2014, contends that, while implicit stereotyping is not racism but an aspect of normal cognition (this was suggested decades before by Skolnick), it is nonetheless harmful and undesirable. In response to these and other findings, implicit bias training programs have been stood up across the nation to develop officer awareness of how attitudes and actions contribute to demographic disparities in the administration of the law. The body of assessments of these programs is not encouraging.

One of the difficulties with arguments from implicit race bias and systemic racism is that claims made on these grounds often take as evidence unexplained variation in racial differences, treating these as indicators of racism. Perhaps this is partially understandable given the difficulty in accessing the interior mental states of officers and criminal justice practitioners and the abstractness of notions of systems. However, it means that conclusions are the work of interpretations that rest, especially on notions of implicit racism, on unfalsifiable assumptions and circularity, where the fact of disparity become evidence of the cause of disparity. On the other hand, if disparities can be accounted for by other factors, the claims of systemic racism become increasingly untenable. 

Awareness of the problem of racial disparities in the criminal justice system is long standing. William Wilbanks, in The Myth of a Racist Criminal Justice System, published in 1986, produced a comprehensive survey of contemporary research studies, searching for evidence of discrimination by police, prosecutors, judges, and prison and parole officers, finding that, although individual cases of racial prejudice and discrimination do occur in the system, there is insufficient evidence to support a charge of systematic racism against blacks in the criminal justice system. “At every point, from arrest to parole,” Wilbanks concludes, “there is little or no evidence of an overall racial effect.”

Robert Sampson and Janet L. Lauritsen’s 1997 comprehensive review of studies of the criminal justice system, a metanalysis published in Crime and Justice, also finds “little evidence that racial disparities result from systematic, overt bias.” In the early 1980s, Joan Petersilia of the RAND corporation came to a similar conclusion.

I have confessed in earlier blogs that I dismissed or was ignorant of these studies in the 1990s when I was researching the historic relationship between racism and criminal justice process (see The Myth of Systemic Racism in Lethal Police-Civilian Encounters). But it’s curious that I was hardly the only pundit to forget or never know that the question had been answered.

Doubt about the claims of racial bias and systemic raised were raised anew in 2016 with the high-profile publication of Heather Mac Donald’s book The War on Cops. The book was followed by Harvard economist Roland Fryer’s 2019 paper, “An Empirical Analysis of Racial Differences in Police Use of Force,” published in the Journal of Political Economy, available much earlier as a preprint (2018) and a working paper (2016). The New York Times covered the working paper in a 2016 article, so the findings were widely available well before the summer months of 2020.

While finding unexplained disparities in nonlethal civilian-police encounters involving force, when turning his attention to the most extreme use of force, i.e., officer-involved shootings, Fryer found no racial differences in either the raw data or when contextual factors are considered. Fryer argues that the patterns in the data are consistent with a model in which police officers are utility maximizers. Fryer suggests that lethal force carries costs great enough to deter officers from using the highest level of force at their disposal.

Fryer is hardly alone in his failure to find racist patterns in lethal police shootings In 2018, psychologist Joseph Cesario and colleagues, in Social Psychological and Personality Science, found, adjusting for crime, no systematic evidence of anti-black disparities in fatal shootings, fatal shootings of unarmed citizens, or fatal shootings involving misidentification of harmless objects. The authors concluded that, when analyzing all shootings, exposure to police, given crime rate differences, accounts for the higher per capita rate of fatal police shootings for blacks. The fact pattern indicating exposure: at least half of homicides and more than half of robberies in America are attributable to black males. Moreover, black males account for some one-third of other serious crimes (aggravated assault, burglary).

David Johnson, Cesario, and others, in the pages of the 2019 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, refer to the effect of rates of violent crime as the “exposure hypothesis,” i.e., that serious criminal activity increases the likelihood of officer-civilian encounters, and this influences the frequency of policing shootings. The evidence Johnson and associates used in their study indicate that, taking crime rates into account, the bias in shootings actually appears to be against whites. 

In a study published in Journal of Crime and Justice, also in 2019, Brandon Tregle and colleagues, when focusing on violent crime arrests or weapons offense arrests, found that blacks appear less likely to be fatally shot by police officers. Rutgers’ Charles Menifield and colleagues found, in a study published in Public Administration Review in 2019 that, although minority suspects are disproportionately killed by police, white officers appear to be no more likely to use lethal force against minorities than nonwhite officers. Most people killed by police are armed at the time of their fatal encounter, and more than two-thirds possess a gun.

Public safety is a quality-of-life issue. Serious crime falls hardest on the poor and working class, especially black and brown people. The most recent statistics on homicide find that 8,543 blacks were murdered compared to 5,498 whites. On the offender side, 7,875 murders were black compared to 4,905 whites. And, although there are more white victims of robbery than black victims—79,566 to 43,164 respectively), there are disproportionately more black victims of robbery relative to population. At the same time, on the offender side, 93,252 robbers were black compared to 44,946. Numbers like these explain the disproportionality in black civilians in fatal police encounters—and why some studies find the unexplained bias actually running in the opposite direction from that claims by progressives.

FBI

The latest statistics from the FBI are horrifying. Consider that the vast majority of murderers are male and black males are only six percent of the population—black males are responsible for well over half of all murders, as well as account for well over half of the victims. Again, such prominent Democrats as Hillary Clinton are openly lying about all this by substituting for the statistics that condemn their policies irrelevant state-level statistics; serious crime is an urban problem. What else do we hear from them? Black lives matter. It doesn’t look like it, doesn’t it? 

Progressives cannot claim to speak for working people while undermining public safety. Ask yourself, why aren’t the progressives who run these cities working to fix the criminogenic conditions that disproportionately affect the marginal communities under their control? Why are they depolicing knowing that doing so makes these communities more dangerous, especially for the most vulnerable? Do not reason and compassion demand that, instead of rationalizing the situation in a manner that perpetuates crime and misery, and falsely accuses cops of racism, that those who claim to speak for marginalized populations would work to identify and solve the problems plaguing black people, the problems of idleness, dependency, fatherlessness, and mass immigration?

There are lots of other reasons to vote Democrats out of office. They have weakened the southern border, allowing millions of foreigners to enter the United States illegally. The empirical impact of mass immigration on the working class is not controversial in circles honest about evidence and effects. Foreign labor drives down wages for native and resident workers to the tune of hundreds of billions annually. Foreign labor takes the jobs of millions of native workers. Mass immigration disorganizes neighborhoods (especially black neighborhoods), fragments culture, and disrupts political formation. Mass immigration falls hardest on the poor and working class, especially black and brown people. Democrats cannot claim to speak for working people while undermining job and income security.

(I have written extensively on this topic on Freedom and Reason, Here’s a sampling: Joe Biden and the Ultimate Source of Our Strength; The Impact of Immigration on Labor and a Nagging Question; What is the Relationship of Immigration to Crime? The Situation at the Border and How to Respond to it; Bernie Sanders, Immigration, and Progressivism; Bernie Sanders Gets it on Open Borders Rhetoric—At Least He Did in 2015; Rationalizing the Border Crisis with Hysteria, Lies, and Smears; Democrats are Being Disingenuous on the Role of Security Fencing in Reducing Illegal Immigration and Crime; The Immigration Situation; The Need for Limits; Smearing Labor as Racist: The Globalist Project to Discredit the Working Class.)

The Democrats have weakened the educational system by prioritizing the dissemination of critical theories (gender, queer, race) over the teaching of critical subject areas. For Democrats, public instruction has become a vehicle for the indoctrination of children in woke progressive ideology.

(For a sampling of my writings on this topic, see Whose Spaces Are These Anyway? Political Advocacy in Public Schools; A Judge Stands on His Head to Save Woke Progressive Indoctrination; The Ethic of Transparency in Public Education—and the Problem of IndoctrinationBanning CRT in Public Instruction); If QAnon is Not a Deep State Construct, It Certainly Functions that WayThe LGBTQ Lobby Sues Florida.)

Central to the woke progressive project is disseminating the lie that the United States is essentially a white supremacist project (see Critical Race Theory: A New RacismWhat Critical Race Theory Is and Isn’t. Spoiler Alert: It’s Racist and Not MarxistCrenshaw Confesses: Critical Race Theory is About Racial ReckoningAwakening to the Problem of the Awokening: Unreasonableness and Quasi-religious Standards). This is the ideology that fed the BLM falsehoods about the criminal justice system—and the youth of America are being fed these falsehoods at a vulnerable age. Failing to teach children the necessary skills to be productive workers and rational thinkers effects poor and working-class children the most, especially black and brown students. Democrats would rather create future Democrats not autonomous individuals with the capacity to challenge their politics and policies.

The Democrats have compromised world peace through NATO expansion and waging a proxy against Russia by injecting tens of billions of dollars into Ukraine (see History and Sides-Taking in the Russo-Ukrainian War). To be sure, there are Republicans who have supported this effort, but Democrats are leading the project. These projects are schemes to drive hundreds of billions of dollars to transnational corporations and the armaments industry.

The Democrats were far and away the party most aggressively pushing lockdowns, social distancing, masks, and vaccines during the pandemic. (As with these other issues, my blogs on Freedom and Reason are many on this topic.) Have you wondered why Democrats aren’t running on the lockdowns, masks, and vaccines? I thought they saved us from the apocalypse. Millions would have died had they not taken away our freedoms and livelihoods—and robbed our children of years of social development. Such heroics sound like something politicians would be keen to run on. What gives?

Democrat policies are behind a series of shocks—COVID, Ukraine, monetary stimulus on a scale unprecedented since World War II—that is driving inflation. In short, supply chain disruption (bottlenecks, dislocations, shortages) caused by Democratic policies and their analogs across the trans-Atlantic sphere, fed by China and other foreign countries taking advantage of the weakness of the West. “On our watch, for the first time in 10 years, seniors are going to get the biggest increase in their Social Security checks they’ve gotten.” Mr. President, tell the people why: SS is chained to inflation.

I ask folks to consider why, now nearly half a century after Roe v Wade, Democrats did not in the meantime codify a woman’s right to her body. I will suggest to you that Democrats did not do so in order to conjure the specter of a conservative court to scare the votes out of women. The tactic failed. The court is conservative. And, with women divided on the question of abortion, and with the issue far down the list of voter concerns, the court’s ruling won’t make a difference at the polls. Conservatives are going to do what they do. Democrats failed to protect reproductive freedom. There’s no quick undoing of things. Other issues are more pressing: crime, war, and the corporate state. Don’t be a reflex. Think.

The overall problem with the Democrats I have discussed many times on Freedom and Reason. The United States was founded as a liberal republic, an instantiation of Enlightenment ideals, embodying the principles of democracy, humanism, rationalism, and secularism, codified in the Constitution and its Bill of Rights, signaled to the world as the American Creed. For the code and creed to live requires patriotism and attention to national integrity. The aims of the Democrats and their philosophy of progressivism are antithetical to the liberalism nationalism that founded the nation. The Democrats are transnationalist in ambition. Globalism undermines national sovereignty. The Democrats preach cultural pluralism, an ideology that undermines common culture and the solidarity built around a shared language and understanding of the establishment of America as a place where the individual is sovereign and the purpose of government is to enable each citizen to realize in total their human nature.

Censoring and Punishing the Heterodox

The practice of power that presumes an orthodoxy, i.e., that there is a right way to think about some matter, for example the claims of the genderist, such that a side can claim to be offended or harmed by contradiction and therefore justifiably censor any heterodox position and even punish the person expressing the contrary position, is quintessentially authoritarian in character. It follows that resisting censorship of, and punishment for, contrary speech has its own purpose: the preservation of liberty and democracy.

Censorship and punishment for heterodox views occur because those who assert the orthodoxy of their own view lack confidence in them and therefore exclude contradiction by censoring and silencing those who dissent from them. Those who truly have confidence in their views, that is, those who expect their views to win the day after a full airing of them and their contradictions, do not fear contradiction.

The geocentrists sought to prevent heliocentrism from having its day in the sun. Flat-earthers marginalized the round-earthers. Creationists sought to exclude the arguments of the evolutionists. But, today, the geocentrists, the flat-earthers, and the creationists are neither censored nor punished; their theories pose no real threat to the orthodoxies to which they now find themselves subordinated. These orthodoxies are confident in themselves because they won the debates on merit in the face of the censors. But the crackpot theory of the genderist cannot win the day on fact and reason, so he must censor and punish the contrarian.

For the genderist to operate–or at least count on others to operate for him–the machinery of censorship and punishment, his apparent orthodoxy must find purchase in the institutions of power, for this where lie the cultural, economic, political, and social forces necessary to impose ideologies upon the masses.

Whereas in the past, false orthodoxies were backed by dominant religious institutions, today, these forces converge in the corporate state, the intersection of big industrial and financial organizations, public administration, and the associated political framework that reproduces and normalizes that power through culture, law, and policy. If gender theory, as well as queer theory and critical race theory, did not have in back of them the corporate state, they would wither and die; their claims could not withstand the lights of fact and reason.

One question with which we must therefore concern ourselves is why the corporate state settled on these particular crackpot theories as the foundation of modern-day quasi-religious dogma. In Galileo’s day, the Church was concerned with his theory not merely because they lacked confidence in their own (many of them already knew they were wrong about the relationship of the sun to the earth) but because the apparent orthodoxy concerning the solar system preserved the dogma that legitimized their power–and not only the institution of religion, but the order of things that had prevailed all around for centuries. They knew that, if science were to replace religion, then the presence of the priest would diminish, and the forces the priest operated would be worked anew by those who had reason on their side.

Today, the body of critical theories, developed to transgress the normative structures of ordinary and stable human existence, is the new religious dogma of the corporate state. Alienating the man from his species-being, from the thing he is naturally, a fact objectively ascertained by science, critical theory prepares the ground for the incorporation of individuals into the bureaucratic collective by uprooting people from the soil of the common humanity.

It is not inevitable that science and technology should end in transhumanism. Science and technology are, after all human productions. Transhumanism is the consequence of science and technology in the hands of concentrated power. It is science as church. The corporate doctor who claims the alchemic power to transition men to women has become in priest in this new church.

Like the Church in Galileo’s day, through unchallengeable dogma, man was alienated from himself to perpetuate an elite structure of power. So it is today that, by denying the ability of man to challenge the dogma of the powerful, man is estranged from himself, the purpose of which is perpetuate elite power over man.

In this fight against the transhumanism of the corporate state, we cannot return to the previous transhumanism of the old religion. We must instead reclaim the ideas of the enlightenment–the ideas of secular humanism, of liberalism and democracy–and steel them against the forces of unreason and unfreedom.

There are those who argue that censoring and marginalizing those who disagree with the apparent orthodoxy is justified on the grounds that their objections are not rational–they do not hail from an appreciation of fact and reason–but are instead irrational expressions, issuing from a place of bigotry and hated. But this argument is a rationalization of the failure of their ideas to win the day. Geocentrism and evolution won the day in the face of irrational forces. So did those who struggled for racial equality. So did those who struggled for marriage equality.

Today, one can appear on social media expressing the view that human beings are divisible into racial groups with variable attributes or that marriage should remain between a man and a woman. In a free society, men will also be able to claim they are women without fear of censorship or punishment. What they won’t be able to do is expect that a social media company will punish other users of that platform for refusing the affirm delusions.

That is, if we can reform the structure of communications such that it reflects not the power of unaccountable corporate entities but instead the principles of free and open society. As we have learned over the last little while, the executive of the United States has instead been working hand-in-glove with the communications industry to push false orthodoxies across a range of issues.